Posted in Athletes, Football, Jamaica, Leadership, Management, politics, Sport

Jamaica and Football Leadership

Football, potentially the sport to bring biggest economic returns to Jamaica is searching for a new President. Since Jamaica’s qualification to the World Cup in 1998, successes have been intermittent.

Football is the richest sport globally. Football also has the biggest television audience globally. Outside of the National Basketball Association (NBA), USA-based, football players combined represent the highest paid athletes in the world. That says a lot; but doesn’t quite add up for Jamaica.

Read here for reference http://www.totalsportek.com/most-popular-sports/

The search for a new President to lead Jamaica into the 2022 and 2026 World Cups (which should be the aim); must be based on a number of things. I will attempt to highlight some qualities, skill-sets and maybe even personality traits of who I think the leader should have most if not all.

The person should be

  • A Leader
  • A Manager
  • A mobilizer
  • A doer
  • A visionary

That leader should be a contemporary leader, one who can take us from vision to reality. There are some key success factors that this leader should be able to manage in the vision to reality road. He/She must be aware of the:

  • Political
  • Economic
  • Social
  • Technological

…impact the sport has to offer and therefore requires a team that can deliver with all this in mind. I know some of you are reading this and saying, but that is storybook type leadership. True, these things are written in books, but having worked in a few sporting organizations, I can tell you of the value of these factors.

In plain language though…it is important to have someone who knows the lay of the land; but should possess the pizzazz needed to transform national expectations to international goals, while attending to the needs of the boardroom.

The business of football is massive and with so many options to choose from in terms of income stream for athletes; income stream for countries via hosting of events and just the networking opportunities; Jamaica must seek to mobilize the best sporting mind to lead what could one of the biggest decisions we are due to take in Jamaica in a long time.

My suggestion is: go rational and not emotional; think with your head and not your heart. At the risk of sounding cold, pick the person who can transform the football in Jamaica into the most successful sporting bodies.

I won’t use this article to pick who I think is best to lead, but what I can say is the person exists in Jamaica.

What this means therefore is

  • Fix the schools’ programme (Manning and Dacosta Cups)
  • Fix the club system (make it more manageable and meaningful)
  • Prepare an international calendar
  • Host more matches at home (the office is a great location)
  • Negotiate good deals for broadcast
  • Expand your manager roles in your clubs. Have people who know the business manage players for the best results
  • Grow the business so experts/employees get paid competitive salaries

Nationally, we need to:

  • Improve playing facilities
    • Only use certified grounds
  • Review roster of officials
  • Have a better mix of experts at the top

Football globally has enough politics…so I say “stay away from the politicians.”

Jamaica needs a well-run football programme to sustain its stay as a sporting brand with all the returns necessary. Choose wisely!

#StayInTheGame

Advertisements
Posted in Caribbean, Cricket, Management, Sport

Quantity and Quality, the case for domestic cricket

January 3 – Ever since the West Indies team has performed under par at least in the last decade a number of suggestions have come forward regarding ways and means to improve its current state. In the last year though so many more of those recommendations have taken place and now the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) and its partners must now determine and chart the way forward.

cropped-cropped-20130628_1545261.jpg

From reports, studies, assessments and opinions from experts – cricket in the Caribbean must take centre stage to, among a number of things, help and develop economic activity and provide wealth to its players, technical teams and officials around the region. The WICB does have a lot of recommendations to fudge through, but it is safe to say WI cricket will be improving over the next three years.

A brief history of Caribbean is found here http://www.espncricinfo.com/westindies/content/story/259978.html- but what we know is the WICB has been associated with the International Cricket Council (ICC) since 1926 and first played Test Cricket in 1928 – so a lot of time in the next two years to celebrate “90”. There will be sometime for the region to unite for a milestone cause and any organisation with 90 years for anything under its belt must celebrate and with the anticipated turnaround of the game in the region, now is as good a time to plan.

Expanded domestic tournaments 

Over the last three years, the WICB has hosted with its partners a significant amount of domestic cricket. The four day competition, the Professional Cricket League in its second year, has ten games on its schedules for the participating teams. The NAGICO Super50 has also expanded and will in 2016 see eight teams competing between January 7 to 23.  The third year NAGICO Insurances-sponsored tournament will be co-hosted by Trinidad & Tobago and St. Kitts Nevis http://windiescricket.com/news/tt-st-kitts-host-nagico-super50 – Later in July the Caribbean Premier League (CPL) in its fourth year will also have a new format http://cplt20.com/news/cpl-ensures-greater-excitement-new-draft-format-2016

CPL T20

What that says is from November back to July the region is able to host its best local talent. In between those months there are international tournaments in all three formats, T20, ODIs and Test for a full year’s schedule. An enterprising young cricketer anywhere from 17 to 40 has a distinct opportunity to earn and to be exposed to all levels of the game across the region and the world.

NAGICO Super50 Logo-2016 general

The case for an improved product can be made if energies are focused on a few things

  • the best players must participate in the domestic tournaments
  • the top marketing companies in the region must support the game through its products and/or services
  • the preparation of these players must be of importance and must be handled by each region; the blue print is available
  • At least twice a year a camp is to be assembled to ensure players attain appropriate fitness levels and have an opportunity to bond at that level – time permitting. I am aware of the camps prior to departure for tournaments

The domestic tournaments ought to be used along with the approved development programmes in each territory and must be priority if we want positive change. The number of games (with expand formats) already matches the quantity; the best players available will create the quality. This substantiates the case for quantity and quality of regional (domestic) cricket and it will clear the path towards a positive case for the improved path of West Indies Cricket.