Posted in Athletes, Entertainment, Music, Sport

PE and Sport – redefining the game

ANTIGUA – The fact that Physical Education and Sport are now being recognized rightfully as an academic course and business respectively – this has opened discussions which are highlighting the lack of understanding of the subject areas.  

I would clearly state here:

·         There is a difference between Physical Education and Sport

·         Physical Education now has for the last 11 years, exams at the highest level from CSEC and has been offered at the CAPE level

·         Sport, through its competition has been known to impact on a society – socially, economically, psychologically, people management

·         Sport Business worldwide is valued at close to a trillion dollars

Based on some recent debates, there may be suggestions that sport is being overused in high schools; is distracting the institutions from their core work; is damaging the reputation of students.

While there are some truths, there are also arguments to support the benefits of being involved in sport at some level, either directly or even as a supporter.

My argument is, the rest of the education system needs to catch so it can efficiently and effectively manage its portfolio, which includes Physical Education. The study of Physical Education is academic, it looks closely of the study of the relationship with mind, body and soul. What about that isn’t academic?

Then Sport is the competitive, strategic and now economic viability of PE aimed at generating wealth, equality and recognition for people and country.

We treat tradition as tradition and think we should not adjust, because that is what it is…tradition. But the non-traditional PE and Sport, having become more user-friendly has used the traditional methods to overtake its competition (pun intended). That process is dynamic, some of us are still stuck in the normal mode and not realizing the potential of equality in the education system where we all can benefit.

Picture this, a school, college, university where the best of the traditional and non-traditional meets…the athletes in any of those institutions are managed by their peers in the traditional line. Where the community stadium is managed by the people there and the earnings are spent there to improve services, accessories and the lives of people. What about this don’t we get?

The Business Model has been presented over and over, but there are ways to capture this. One must first allow themselves to be open to new and innovative ways of doing business, and sport is one such way. the_business_of_sport_logo[1]

Research has also shown that sport can be used as ‘soft power’ for a nation such as Jamaica which continues to battle with its economic activities. I could make the same justification for music and entertainment.

Education needs to be redefined in Jamaica as part of a community where Parents, Teachers, Community Leaders forge partnerships with the students to build a nation. I challenge the Ministry of Education to create this model for growth for education. Be open to ideas that work and use people who are capable to manage. STEP in the Game!

Advertisements
Posted in Caribbean, Cricket, Leadership, Management, Sport

CARICOM, Sport and Cricket

KINGSTON, November 7 – Much of what has been suggested by the CARICOM Committee on Cricket has already been put in Cricket operations and programmes by the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) over the years. I have seen evidence of what former President, Julian Hunte instituted in his six years as head of that unit.

In 2009, Hunte disclosed that – contrary to popular belief – the Governance Review Committee report is being utilised. The Patterson Report, for example was commissioned by the WICB in 2007 to do a top-to-bottom review of the operations of West Indies cricket. But Hunte, the WICB president at the time said that the regional governing body had been, or was taking action on 47 of the 65 recommendations contained in the report, but there was only one with which the directors had extreme difficulty. Here is a news story which spoke of the issue at the time http://www.stabroeknews.com/2009/sports/08/11/%E2%80%98we%E2%80%99re-using-patterson-committee-report-says%E2%80%99-hunte/

The story went on to say too, that one recommendation which was not accepted in full was the proposal for the establishment for a new entity to be renamed and headed by a two-tiered body called a Cricket West Indies Council that would sit above the Cricket West Indies Board. That is still one of the main issues today, hence the call for the WICB to be dissolved.

Since then, Dave Cameron, President since 2013 has even accepted more of the recommendations from that Patterson report and has used up to 80 per cent of its recommendations but has opted not to add the additional layer as prescribed to turn the fortunes around of the WICB http://sundominica.com/articles/wicb-directors-to-discuss-governance-matters-at-an-2011/

This article clearly states the following:

  • The WICB has previously implemented over 80% of the recommendations of the Patterson Report and agreed to the majority of the Governance Committee report which was chaired by Charles Wilkin QC.
  • At a specially convened meeting of the members of the WICB in 2012, 10 of the 17 recommendations were agreed to. Specifically directors nominated by the Territorial Boards no longer represent the Territorial Boards at Annual General Meetings.
  • Further as generally recommended by the Patterson Report the WICB is about to conclude the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding with the six Professional Cricket League franchises. This follows the implementation of the PCL and the six franchises which are being independently and professionally administered through the Territorial Boards.

WICB Logo 1

The PCL now in its second year started on November 6 – you can catch live action here http://windiescricket.com/news/watch-live-pcl-r4day-round-1-day-2

The question is really, what has sparked this recommendation? This writer won’t make any assumptions, however, what I will point out to you are some inadequacies, inconsistencies and shoddy way in which CARICOM has treated sport in the last decade. Let me declare here too that I have been part of a team which helped to develop papers, spoken at meetings among other things on Sport and Sport Tourism and have been disappointed in the way the follow up has been handled. CARICOM no longer has a specific sport unit which is clear in my mind its lack of will to be an active participant in one of the fastest growing sectors in the world.

In 2008, CARICOM baulked on the idea of establishing a CARICOM Sports Commission, intended to outline ‘guidelines for member governments to place sport prominently in the matrix of regional development’ (Joseph, Keith. “Caricom Sports Commission an Urgent Necessity.” SVGOC. N.p., 13 Mar. 2008. Web. 2 July 2015.)  http://www.caribbeannewsnow.com/topstory-Sports-Commentary%3A-CARICOM-needs-renewed-attention-to-sports-26794.html

Here is another major programme on which CARICOM planned to implement and the status of that is on record as being behind its schedule 
http://www.caricom.org/jsp/community_organs/regionalsurvey_sportsprogrammes.jsp?menu=cob

A Caribbean Journal article almost five years ago asked this question – Where is the Caribbean Regional Sport Academy for Sport that CARICOM had in its plans?

http://caribjournal.com/2011/07/25/caricom-plans-regional-sports-academy/#

How can CARICOM really help?

CARICOM should start by doing the following:

  • Diversifying its institutions/associate institutions to include one which has sport at its core functions
  • Adding back the sport unit to its functions
  • Implementing the sport programmes it still has in study forms
  • Re-call the committee of Iva Gloudon, Yolande Selman, Richie Rchardson, Peter Adrien, Keith Joseph and I to update the proposal we made and add a young entrepreneur, an academic and an athlete to that team and ensure that this is done
  • Re-engage the PE teachers group to see how the teaching of Physical Education has evolved
  • Facilitate programmes to measure the success of home-grown Caribbean athletes and how they stack up to the rest of the world; while ensuring the next generation has a real chance
  • Look at the sport of choice for the ages of 12 – 19 and facilitate development

You see folks the CARICOM Report on the Cricket is not just about the cricket it really should be about the worldwide US$648 million industry and how we as a people can transform the talent which exists to create wealth, have the best facilities and have sport be a part of the Caribbean Economy as an option.

CARICOM like the UWI need to evaluate how it functions in region of such diversity but maintaining the core of what makes us as a people successful. WICB, CONCACAF, NORCECA all report to their international bodies and any indication of political interference sparks controversy.

The recommendations could help to bolster any opportunity to attract more committed talent to all our sporting disciplines including cricket. Sir Garry Sobers said it best recently when he remarked that the sport of cricket needed more committed players, now there is a great place to start. The return on investment in cricket is high as it is one of the most popular sporting disciplines in the world. It is time for CHANGE.

Team-Building

Posted in Uncategorized

Women’s View on PE and Sport (2007)

REPUBLISHED FROM OCTOBER 2007 – With the call I have made for greater emphasis to be placed on Physical Education (PE) in the schools system in Jamaica; I did a survey a few months ago and found some startling results. The results of the survey suggested that women over 30 years of age in Jamaica went to primary and high schools in a time when there was some amount of emphasis on PE in schools across the island. Although the question was not asked directly, it was almost even the percentage between those who went to co-educational versus a single sex school. PE should be done at least twice a week 

Women in the age group up to 26 years of age only did physical education (PE) once a week in both primary and high schools; while women over 30 did twice a week in primary schools. The women up to 30 years are satisfied that once a week for children up to 12 (primary schools) and children up to 19 (high schools) is good enough. 

The results have indicated that the women in the over 30 age group see the importance of PE/organized activities in the primary and high school systems and think there should be sessions for at least twice a week. Some of these same women in the over 30 category did PE three times a week in high school, but it included swimming. Those women went to school in Kingston and/or boarding institutions. 

When asked how often they think children should do PE in school up to 12 years old; 50 per cent said once a week; while 44 per cent of the sample thought children should do PE at least twice a week in high school up to 19 years of age. 

Start organized activities from 0 – 4 years

Of the women sampled, 56 per cent suggested that children start organized activities from as early as they can walk; 38 per cent said children should start at four years, while a small six per cent said organized activities should start at nine years old. Marilyn Wellymeyer wrote in a 1986 article for CNN that “The fitness boom has bypassed America’s children. Most are fatter, many weaker and slower than they used to be, according to government surveys over the past two years. While their parents work out in record numbers, half the nation’s 26 million fifth- through 12th-graders probably do not get enough exercise to develop sound hearts and lungs.” 

I do not have enough evidence to say there is obesity among children problem in Jamaica, but from observation, we could do better.
In 2006, Dr. Eva Lewis Fuller of the Ministry of Health made a plea for mandatory physical activity in schools. “The recommendation really is to have the full impact of at least half an hour of physical activity three times a week at least, to have an impact in making you healthier and to increase your feeling of well being.” She went on to say that “physical education is very important and should be included in the curriculum as an essential and mandatory subject.” Echoing my sentiments that PE is not extra curricular, but instead should be treated as part of the every day curriculum. 

More survey findings
Of the sample of women who were questioned, 40 per cent of the women who were in the 36 to 40 years of age watch television for an average of three hours a day; only 18 per cent of that group watch for just an hour. They are in the under 30 years age group. 40 per cent of the women over 40 also watch television for more than three hours a week. 

What kinds of programmes so they watch on TV? 44 per of the overall sample preferred drama while 34 per cent preferred sporting programmes, 19 per cent action and three per cent indicated they liked the soaps. Half of the women went to three or more major sporting events a year; 31 per cent go to two 10 per cent went to one and the nine per cent does not go to any at all. 


The sample was 320. 

Posted in Uncategorized

Physical Education & Sport vs the rest

The fact that Physical Education and Sport are now being recognised rightfully as an academic course and business respectively – this has opened up discussions which are highlighting the lack of understanding of the subject areas.

  • I would clearly state here – There is a difference between Physical Education and Sport. Physical Education now has for the last five years, exams at the highest level from CSEC and to be offered soon at the CAPE level.
  • Sport, through its competition has been known to impact on a society – socially, economically, psychologically
  • Sport Business world wide is valued at close to a trillion dollars
  • Based on some recent outbursts, there may be suggestions that sport is being overused in high schools; is distracting the institutions from their core work; is damaging the reputation of students. I challenge the writer that the rest of the education system needs to catch so it can efficiently and effectively manage its portfolio, which includes Physical Education.

Image

The study of Physical Education is academic, it looks closely of the study of the relationship with mind, body and soul. What about that isn’t academic? Then Sport is the competitive, strategic and now economic viability of PE aimed at generating wealth, equality and recognition for people and country. We treat tradition as tradition and think we should not make adjustments, because that is what it is…tradition. But the non-traditional PE and Sport, having become more user-friendly has used the traditional methods to overtake its competition (pun intended). What that process is dynamic, some of us are still stuck in the normal mode and not realising the potential of equality in the education system where we all can benefit. Picture this, a school, college, university where the best of the traditional and non-traditional meets….the athletes in any of those institutions are managed by their peers in the traditional line. Where the community stadium is managed by the people there and the earnings are spent there to improve services, accessories and the lives of people. What about this don’t we get? The Business Model has been presented by The Business of Sport and I invite the doubters to engage us to catch up to speed with the information. Research has also shown that sport can be used as ‘soft power’ for a nation such as Jamaica which continues to battle with its economic activities. I could make the same justification for music and entertainment.

One of the challenges of being in a small circle, is none of us are willing to make bold decisions and move on with the programme; we have (The Business of Sport) and we urge you to join us. Education needs to be redefined in Jamaica as part of a community where Parents, Teachers, Community Leaders forge partnerships with the students to build a nation.

I challenge the Ministry of Education to create this model for growth for education. Be open to ideas that work and use people who are capable to manage.

Image

Get in the Game!

Posted in Sport

Physical Education – Key to a child’s development

There has been much talk recently about the role of sport in high schools in Jamaica. Sport can be considered (for this conversation) – organised competitive activities in age groups aimed at having a winner. 

It is important however, to point out that there is a course in the high schools called Physical Education which is an educational/academic course aimed at achieving psychomotor learning, movement in a play environment while seeking to enhance health and hygiene practices. 

If schools, teachers and principals focus more on those objectives, then the learning process in primary and high schools would be able to achieve its goals. What has happened in some instances over the years, is sport has overtaken the desires of those who want to “win at all cost” and has ignored the fundamentals of what Physical Education should really be. 

Let us take a grade 7 ( 10 – 12 year old) class of girls and boys, new into high school in a football (soccer) class – they should do the following 

  • learn to appreciate the space available to them on the field 
  • get to know the ball 
  • learn the basics of the sport – dribbling, passing and shooting (attacking skills) or keeping your opponent from getting the ball and keeping it long enough to pass it to your team member

There are minor games which are developed and can be used effectively to teach these skills. In the meantime the discerning PE teacher can look out for those with good eye-hand coordination, ability to carry out the skills effectively & efficiently and those who can use the space provided well. It is the same for most sport when learning from the basics. That is what PE is supposed to be. 

The other aspects of PE which should be introduced are the physical aspects – warm up and cool down to look at use of muscles, how muscles are to be prepared and after work out how to return to normal, before running off to the next class. 

In some schools that process ends after three years and children would have been exposed to at least five sport over that period – netball, football, track and field, basketball, cricket, hockey, swimming, gymnastics…based on the schools. Each of those sport has basic techniques which are to be passed on. Closer to the end of each class there is a competition designed to enhance the skill(s) learned to ensure that the student gets an opportunity to operate in two instances

  1. using the skill under no pressure for results 
  2. using the skill in a competitive environment 

The other competition comes in for the inter-form, inter-house and in some cases inter-schools (a batch of three or more). That is what Physical Education is and should still be. 

 

Coaches who want to win

The traditional school which has a history of winning certain competitions nationally creates the sport plan which looks at an external coach, most times stepping over the PE teacher’s authority. What should really happen is the PE teacher is to provide a report on the progress of the students to indicate who may/may not be ready for competition. This does not happen in a lot of cases, so what we get a bunch of young men/women going to a programme and having to be taught all over again. 

The practice of forcing children to compete in a fierce environment can be damaging to self esteem, confidence while turning that child away from his/her peers. What then is the solution? 

PE should aim for the following: 

  • eight of every ten children should be physically active in primary schools (Play is a child’s profession) 
  • eight of very ten children should have at least two hours of PE a week in schools for at least four years (11- 17 years) 
  • of the 11 – 17 age group, up to 50 per cent of them should be participating in at least one sport in the community at least once a week

Active Schools 

A few years ago I recommended we select a cohort of active schools. These are schools with the best facilities for PE – space, equipment, teachers…track them and see how much more healthy and adaptable the children are to society. 

While I know the focus on sport in schools – I know too that if PE programmes are allowed to be managed effectively, we will have a more rounded education programme, after all PE is Physical Education. More recent times, schools have also instituted yoga, deep breathing and tai chi as part of their programmes – focused on the mental a little more. 

Let’s talk some more about this and offer solutions. Image