Posted in Athletes, Caribbean, Cricket, West Indies

TINO BEST AND JIMMY ADAMS LEAD TEAMS FOR CHARITY

Bridgetown, Barbados – Former West Indies, fast bowler, Tino Best and former Captain, Jimmy Adams will lead two teams for a T-10 Charity match under the theme, Understanding Risk, Friday (May 31) in Barbados.

The match, which is scheduled for the 3Ws Oval at the UWI, Cave Hill Campus is part of an overall conference scheduled for the island May 27 to May 31.

Best, now a cricket commentator, will lead a team that will include outstanding retired Windies players, like Philo Wallace, Ridley Jacobs, Nixon McLean.

Adams, Director of Cricket at Cricket West Indies, will lead a team that will have among its line up Sylvester Joseph, Sherwin Campbell, Nikita Miller and Alick Athanaze.

Four of Barbados’ women’s team players, Keila Elliott, Pam Lavine, Reshelle Griffith and Charlene Taitt will also share the spotlight. Elliott and Griffith will play with Best; while Lavine and Taitt are on the team with Adams.

Best is always happy to give back and he thinks “this initiative is worthy of support.” And Adams agrees, that “any opportunity to unite the people of the region through sport, is always a wonderful opportunity.”


The rest of the line up will include a mix of local players (currently playing in the domestic competition) corporate executives and cricket enthusiasts.

The match will begin at 5pm.

About the conference

Scheduled just before the 2019 hurricane season begins, the Understanding Risk Caribbean Conference aims to celebrate the Caribbean’s disaster resilience; identify gaps that still exist; and galvanize governments, companies, and private citizens to share information, innovations and lessons learned to address disaster risk.

Understanding Risk is a global community of 8,000+ experts and practitioners active in the creation, communication, and use of disaster risk information. The community convenes every two years at UR Forums – five-day events that highlight groundbreaking work, facilitate nontraditional partnerships, and showcase new technical know-how in disaster risk identification. In the interim, regional conferences like UR Caribbean are also held to galvanize localized efforts and build regional capacity in the area of disaster risk assessment.

The partners for this event are the World Bank Group, Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA); European Union, Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR) and Barbados.

-ENDS-

Squads read:

  1. Tino Best – Captain
  2. Zorol Barthley
  3. Tamani Best
  4. Shavon Brooks
  5. Shak Cumberbatch
  6. Keila Elliott
  7. Reshelle Griffith
  8. Ronald Jackson
  9. Ridley Jacobs
  10. Nixon McLean
  11. Philo Wallace

Other

  1. Jimmy Adams – Captain
  2. Alick Athanaze
  3. Sherwin Campbell
  4. Romi Holder
  5. Sylvester Joseph
  6. Pamela Lavine
  7. Michael Matthews
  8. Nikita Miller
  9. Winston Reid
  10. Kemar Smith
  11. Andrew Straughn
  12. Charlene Taitt
Advertisements
Posted in Cricket

Kensington and Lucas Cricket Clubs – representing Rollington Town

KINGSTON, Jamaica – On Saturday, May 4 when Kensington and Lucas Cricket Clubs take the field for a Junior Cup match; the game will not only have an important result for defending champions, Kensington, but will have an all-important historical context for the roles these two sporting/cricketing clubs continue to play in the Rollington Town community.

Kensington Cricket Club

The cricket has been the core focus of the two clubs from as far back as 1879 and 1895 respectively; but when Kensington hosts its 140th year of existence this October, the weekend event will seek to do a few things:

  • Identify the role cricket has played in the community
  • Show the impact all the great cricketers have had on the community, Jamaica, the West Indies and the World
  • Help to re-focus the community on how it can re-engage residents to continue the path to growth and development
Lucas Cricket Club

Rollington Town sits in the Eastern Kingston constituency and is surrounded by schools and other inner-city communities all with similar characteristics – close knit families; rich sporting history, once a quiet community, but now begs basic development to include the necessities for a place to live, grow families and so business. The accessories of the place, as it is, are not sufficient to transform the legacy of a community with that much history and more.

CRICKET

Kensington for instance has had outstanding personalities like JK Holt Jr, Chester Watson, Alf Valentine, Lawrence Rowe, Herbert Chang, Richard Austin, Basil Williams, Patrick Patterson, Uton Dowe, Robert Haynes, Laurie Williams, Wavell Hinds, Darren Powell and David Bernard Jr. 

Lucas is the home of George Headley, Frank Worrell, Easton “Bull” McMorris, Everton Mattis, Gareth Breese and Chris Gayle. The immeasurable impact these men have had on cricket is what helps to consolidate the role of the game and how it may help to influence the community and cricket for the next generation.

Since 2012, Lucas has been the base of the Chris Gayle Foundation, an organization which has partnered with the England-based Cricket For Change. The resources from the partnership have been used to train at-risk young people while guiding them to become better employment prospects. Lucas is believed to have been the first club in Jamaica to admit black players in the late 1920s.

SENIOR CUP

On the occasion of the 110th anniversary of the Senior Cup in Jamaica (2007), Historian Arnold Betram wrote this about Kensington Cricket Club:

The cricketers who registered Kensington Cricket Club in 1879 began as the St. Andrew Juniors, a group of students of St. George’s College who left with their headmaster, Father Jaeckel, to establish the Marie Villa School at 37 Duke Street, in September 1877.

Among these young cricketers were J.M. Burke, S.C. Cargill, Ernest DaCosta and Dr. J.F. Cargill, who gave a part of his property in Camperdown for their playing field. In 1881, the club moved to Emerald Park on North Street and Cosmo Lorenzo Dicks succeeded E.G. Orrett as captain. The Dicks family owned a property in St. Catherine called Kensington, hence the name change from St. Andrew Juniors to Kensington.

Coming into the competition, Kensington certainly had the most enthusiastic group of cricketers, including two of the finest young cricketers in the island, J.J. Cameron and G.V. Livingston.

In the two decades preceding the start of Senior Cup Cricket in 1897, the record shows that they played 202 matches, winning 125, losing 61 and drawing 16.

Kensington – 2019 Junior Cup Squad

Wavell Hinds captains and coaches Kensington’s Junior Cup Team. His twin sons Alex and Corey play for this team (both attend Wolmer’s). He is surrounded by a set of youngsters all aimed at balancing their lives on and off the pitch.

While Lucas will look to Brandon English, Shane Ricketts and Jaheem Rankine for leadership for this league.

The 10 am match on Saturday, May 4 should deliver on its promises of an exciting match-up; and should spark an interesting conversation concerning the clubs’ history.

See you there!

Posted in Alzarri Joseph, Athletes, Caribbean, Cricket, Rahkeem Cornwall, Sports

Joseph and Cornwall making progress

St John’s, ANTIGUA – WINDIES Senior Team pacer, Alzarri Joseph and WINDIES A team all-rounder Rahkeem Cornwall have been in an intensive rehabilitation and fitness program.

Joseph’s program has been geared towards helping him recover and rehabilitate from a stress injury to his back, sustained during the WINDIES tour of New Zealand late last year. Joseph has already completed four weeks of physical training and is currently on his 16 day of “return to bowling” program.

IMG_1918

High-Performance Director, Graeme West is pleased with Alzarri’s progress and reaction to the rehabilitation program. West indicated “The really positive thing so far is that there’s been no negative reaction by his body to bowling. Roddy Estwick has introduced a couple small technical changes that we hope will help his efficiency and take a little bit of stress off his bowling action.”

Cornwall, on the other hand, has had a shorter period since starting the fitness program but is making quick progress. He has played a considerable amount of cricket over the last 6 months. However, CWI has identified a window where he could focus on some physical training and he is currently working six days a week with Strength and Conditioning Coach to complete a three-week program.

IMG_1937

West was also pleased with the progress and determination that Cornwall has shown, “He’s progressing very well and will be putting that to the test soon, with some club cricket in Antigua. The ultimate goal is to have him ready for ongoing tours to include, but not limited to WINDIES A tour of the England, CPL, Super50 and the 4-Day League.”

Both Cornwall and Joseph train at the Coolidge Cricket Ground. Strength and Conditioning Expert, Ronald Rogers is part of the team included in the recovery of both players.

The program is managed by West, along with Dr. Oba Gulston Manager of Sports Medicine and Science, along with Rogers and Bowling Consultant Roddy Estwick.

*CWI Media Release*

Posted in Advertising, Athletes, Branding, Caribbean, Cricket, Media, Sport, Sports

The Business of West Indies Cricket – 2016 and beyond

Sunday, August 7 –

At a time when the Summer Olympics is happening in Brazil, world sports take centre stage and the discussions are varied. These discussions range from salaries of international stars to which sports will be in the next Summer Olympic Games. The IOC even used the opportunity to announce five disciplines which they plan to include in 2020 – these are baseball/softball, karate, skateboarding, sport climbing and surfing.

Also in the last week, Forbes revealed the 2016 world’s highest paid athletes. No cricket athlete is on that list. There was no cricketer in the top-100 either. In the top 50 though, basketball and the National Football League (NFL) dominated with 12 and 13 athletes respectively. Football (Soccer) and baseball each had six; while tennis had five including one female; golf, racing, boxing and track and field completed the list. The range of the salaries (without endorsements) were from a low of $26.1m to a high of $88m.

See the complete Forbes list http://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/2/#tab:overall

What does this mean for the business of cricket? What does this mean for cricketers in the Caribbean and their abilities to earn salaries they can consider competitive among their peers as elite athletes?

Cricket is in the top five most watched sports for a global television audience, however most of us know where a considerable amount of that audience comes from. What then can the International Cricket Council (ICC) do to generate interest in attracting a more varied group? Lots of points to consider.

TopTenMostWatchedSports

The real reason for this column though is to look seriously at the key success factors in the developing a cricket industry in the Caribbean and thus making it attractive to attract a wider pool of talent and corporate support to build relationships and partnerships of value.

Here is a look at some variables

  • Number of competitions regionally
  • Number of competitions internationally
  • Number of employees (athletes/cricketers) and their salaries
  • Value of corporate investment
  • Value of endorsements to athletes and teams/franchises
  • Television and media rights

The discussion has to be pushed beyond the basic, but instead really focus on

  • Who views the product
  • In what form
  • How long they view the product
  • What are the preferred forms?

Then the discussion moves to – what adjustments will the administration do to create additional value around the product?

Reach

At the moment the West Indies Cricket Board (WICB) has access to 300 players in tcompetition each year at several levels in and out of the region. In a move which could help consolidate the value – maybe there is a way to look at who are the most valuable players – male/female. There are clear examples how other worldwide leagues promote their elite personalities. Also those personalities have to be prepared to turn on each time on the field of play and offer consistent performances. The cliché of “cricket is a game of glorious uncertainties” is being outweighed as the competition across the board with other elite athletes makes it harder for fans to watch a game where athletes/players go scoreless today and scores 200 tomorrow…but instead should be one where players “show up” each time.

Am I asking for too much? Maybe I am, but in 2016, those are some harsh realities facing cricket as a sport and the television audience watching cricket is not as ‘powerful’ to swing the marketing dollar enough to its benefit to attract major support.

The Caribbean population is certainly not enough to generate any considerable dent in stirring the pot; however, the influence of a value-added personality who can perform on and off the field could be the start of how cricket can convert to a more lucrative position.

Over the next cricket year, the number of days would almost double from 60 in the last period to 105 and that gives the game additional opportunities for packaging; but that should and must have some star-power. Who will it be?

 

Posted in Cricket, Leadership, Management, Sport

Governance and sporting organisations

May 2 – The debate about governance in sport continues to rage. Closer home in the West Indies there are several suggestions regarding governance in cricket. There are always ways and means being devised to be efficient and effective simultaneously. One thing is sure, there is no one-size fit all model which works, but it is important to adjust based on the needs of the global sporting industry at the time while ensuring that the revenue streams remain open.

The ideal answer for any sporting organisation lies in the organisation’s ability to create an environment for its athletes to have the best access to preparation to perform at the highest level and to maximise earnings for as long as is possible.

The sporting organisation is also to facilitate a workable environment for all its stakeholders – public and private sectors aimed at getting the best returns on brand value of the sport.

HighPerformance SportSportsStructures

According to Arnout Geeraert “the self-governed hierarchic networks that traditionally constitutes the sport world are increasingly facing attempts by governments – mostly due to the commercialization of sport – and empowered stakeholder organisations to interfere in their policy processes.” He went on to say that there is a shift from the top down structure to a flatter and horizontal form which demand a new standard of governance.

My take on governance is there is always a challenge in the process of maintaining ‘good governance’ as sporting federations try to maintain the balance between choosing the most appropriate model and how resources are used to maximise the value of the sport at the time. The human, physical, financial and technological elements are all important.

Four major and keys areas which all contribute to better sport governance are:

  • Transparency and public communication
  • Democratic process
  • Checks and balances
  • Solidarity

Sport in the 21st century and beyond requires the most effective management with the highest return on investment.

There is the business model which is designed to earn a profit in the marketplace and the sport’s value is at the base of this model. This process has to be managed where the leaders are focused on ensuring the sport product has the greatest value. The mistake sport leaders make is they believe business models are equal to revenue models; both are similar but not the same. As it turns out, revenues and costs are key to making a good business model. Below is an example of how the concept of a business model become concrete:

BusinessModelFocus

The four key areas of what good governance is perceived as today must be adhered to. Sporting organisations must be prepared to let the public know what they are doing. Sporting bodies should take into consideration stakeholder participation is important and its democratic processes are paramount to selecting the most appropriate/available/able people at the time. The lack of a true democratic process will often result in mismanagement.

A highlight of true democracy is being able to have the systems work. Geeraert in his article in Play The Game suggests that “a checks and balances system is paramount to prevent the concentration of power in organisation and it ensures decision-making is robust, independent and free from improper influence.” The final of the four – solidarity – is really where organisations figure that social, environmental and ethical practices can complement and supplement the day-to-day work.

For more on Play The Game visit here http://playthegame.org/

The issues surrounding sport are global and in the 2015 edition of the Play The Game conference there were a series of topics of which – Good governance in sport: setting standards, raising bars – was discussed. You can view the presentations here http://playthegame.org/conferences/play-the-game-2015/

The discussion continues.

Note: Information collected from Play The Game; coachr.org

Posted in Advertising, Athletes, Branding, Caribbean, Cricket, Jamaica, Media, Sport, Track and Field

The Caribbean’s lost decade(s) in sport

April 9 – When one thinks of a list professional athletes from the Caribbean, Jamaican, Lindy Delapenha comes to mind as one of the pioneers. It has been widely reported that he was the first Jamaican ever to play professional football in the UK. He served in the British army and played football where he was identified and got a trial first with Arsenal. He never did play for them, but instead, played for Portsmouth in 1948 where he won a championship medal. Two years later he transferred to Middlesbrough where his career took off and he was the leading goal scorer for three seasons from the 1951 to 1956 period. In total he appeared in 270 games where he scored 93 league and FA Cup goals. He moved back to Jamaica thereafter and pursued a career in broadcasting – but continued his sojourn in sport where he played cricket and football.

Lindy

Another Jamaican, Allan Cole played professional football between 1968 and 1972 for Atlanta Chiefs and Nautico in Brazil. Reports show that he scored three goals on those two missions.

Allan-skill-cole-

The 70s produced a longer list which was filled up with mostly cricketers at the time and in 1977 there was the World Series Cricket, which at the time was a break away (outfit) professional cricket competition organised by an Australian, Kerry Packer. He owned then, a television station called Nine Network. The matches organised, competed directly with international cricket and had a distinct influence on the nature of the game, still permeating the sport today. The Packer Series as it was popularly called then was successful because players thought they were not paid enough and Packer provided those opportunities. He wrestled with the Australian Broadcasting Association (ABC) for exclusive rights of the regular cricket and Packer not getting his wish started his own series.

Secret agreements at the time were signed with three leading captains, West Indies – Clive Lloyd; Australia – Greg Chappell and England – Tony Greig. The series also included top players from Pakistan and South Africa. The Packer story in another form has continued to disrupt the ICC’s hold on cricket which has kept them on their toes. The West Indies remained an active participant. Packer also had his eyes on the rugby league but his attempt at that failed. News came out that a book by former player agent, Ricky Nixon offers details on how Packer operated http://www.theage.com.au/afl/afl-news/kerry-packer-considered-a-rebel-afl-league-book-claims-20160407-go0txz.html

Allen Stanford was next and he “used” the West Indies as a place to go up against the more formal systems of the International Cricket Council (ICC). It is important to note, that India, where the T20 format of the game now thrives, had vowed some years ago, never to play this version. How times have changed. Here cricket expert writer, Tim Wigmore gives his account of how the World T20 was formed http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/story/971333.html

Since those heady years from 1977 to now, the Caribbean has had its own fair share of professional athletes in other sporting disciplines, from football, basketball, track and field, horseracing, boxing and in recent times a few women have gotten contracts to play netball in the Pacific.

How then has this economically-vulnerable region capitalized on the Business of Sport? Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica have pretty much lead the way with the number of pro-athletes across the board. FIFA World Cup Qualification, performances in World Championships in Athletics, the NBA, the NFL have all had decent representation from a wide range of Caribbean athletes. The value of those athletes along with cricket rack up a considerable sum and so far this year we as a region have not figured out a workable formula to estimate the value of sport to the Caribbean economy.

Jamaica in a publication by its Planning Institute, Economic and Social Survey, indicates that Sport as a sector, contributes up to 3 per cent to its gross domestic product. Those figures are conservatively measured by major events, visitor spend and to some extent earnings of the athletes. That in itself is limited. You can visit the PIOJ’s website at www.pioj.gov.jm

That is a programme I would wish to see taken on by an institution like the Mona School of Business, a UWI subsidiary, similar to that of the University of Pennsylvania’s – The Wharton School – use its research efforts to track non-traditional contributors to an economy. The release of that information highlighting trends and forecasts should help to guide/influence government and private sector should be mandated, as it is key in determining how some related decisions are made. In developing the variables to be measured, like that of the international global sport index, there has to be room for that process to take place, and now.

From the perspective of the Business of Sport, a question to ask, Was the 2000 – 2009 decade, the lost decade for the Caribbean Sport Economy? We have ten refurbished or new cricket venues which were built in time for 2007 for the Cricket World Cup. Trinidad and Tobago also built and refurbished facilities to host the Under 17 World Cup. While that was going on Trinidad and Tobago qualified for the final round of the FIFA World Cup in 2006, but exited at the group stage without winning a game, and Jamaica back in 1998.

It was only later in the decade in 2009 in Berlin, after the Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, that Usain Bolt excited the world with 9.58 and 19.19 seconds in the 100 and 200 metres respectively and track and field, with far less valued endorsements, gained traction in the global sport market for the region. The irony is – in spite of a significant dent in the hearts and minds of people, the global dollar value of track and field doesn’t quite measure up to its competitors in football, basketball or cricket.

Already half way through this decade, where is the region’s focus on sport as a sector to even energise private sector to invest more and for governments to facilitate sustained development in this obviously growing industry.

Some questions to be answered:

  1. How many tourists have come to the region because of sporting events?
  2. How have the existing venues been used for hosting of major events?
  3. Which organisation in the Caribbean is tracking those earnings and analysing them for use to promote or even to focus, re-focus our attention on what is in the best interest for the region?
  4. How have our academic institutions used the performances of the region’s athletes in the last 20 years to project and forecast for 20 years to come?
  5. Which Caribbean institution is most able to lead the charge in determining the way forward for sport business in the Caribbean?
  6. Who is preparing the Business of Sport model for the Caribbean? And who is ready to support?

The exposure to the region whether assumed or not has been incredible and somehow the conversion has not taken place. The efforts by a failed single market economy programme, free movement as per the Treaty of Chaguaramus among other Caribbean-led initiatives have been thwarted by bureaucratic bundling by governments failing to acknowledge the role sport can play in economic activity.

In spite of pointing fingers toward West Indies Cricket, as a sporting body  which has been responsible for the highest circulation of funds in the region, at least for the last five years; and instead of building on that model, there are efforts to dismantle.

The results of the last three major world championships for the under 19, women and men show a win for the West Indies. We have defeated three countries with far more resources alone and cumulatively. The countries are India, Australia and England. That must account for something. Incidentally England was beaten twice.

I therefore suggest we seek to develop the strategies needed to push the Caribbean sport industry forward by first of all recognizing it officially and place well-needed resources to fuel the growth that is obvious.

Once again the Summer Olympic Games will happen and governments will scurry to talk about legacy programmes. What really should happen is UWI, CARICOM, Caribbean Export and each member country choose its best sporting minds and gather by October 2016 to chart a path forward.

When I started this article, I had intended to focus on a lost decade – 2000 to 2009; but here we are in 2016 with three years for this decade, and I wonder.

Let’s get in the game.

FG-Sports-Market-4

Posted in Cricket, Sport

The facts about the WICB & Cameron

March 18 – Today I am also going to talk about the WICB under Dave Cameron and a team he has assembled along with the Cricket Community. He became President March 2013 and since then, the following has happened
1. There are now 90 First Class players contracted – what this means, they have a (cricket) job
2. There are 11 women who are contracted – same rule as above
3. There are 15 players who are “retained” – at a significantly higher salary than the other two groups
4. We have a number of players on pay-per-play
5. The 50-over version of the game has been expanded. This year 27 games in 18 days
6. The Regional 4Day has also been expanded – two seasons of 10 rounds of games – first time in the history of 1st class cricket
7. The CPL is the region’s T20 (yes it is) it is a partnership with the WICB – with additional salaries ranging from US$5,000 – US$150,000 per game + incentives
8. The players have windows to ply their trade overseas and the IPL schedule is open to all those who qualify
9. The deficit has been reduced and in the last Financial year which ended Sep 30, 2015 a surplus of US$3.5 million was reached
10. WIPA & WICB have a much better relationship & the astronomical legal fees have moved from 2.4 million to under 400K last year.

Let us talk about CHANGE – and the impact 116 paid players have on different economies in the region. That has to be sustained so the teams can compete with their peers worldwide.

Since 1928 – the West Indies has had 19 interruptions in tours and while we do not want to see walk outs – they happen. How we manage that going forward is key.

Some conservative figures…Cricket alone can account for anywhere up from US$100million a year of business in the region and that figure does not include athletes’ endorsements. All of our players live in the region. That can triple in three years – give it time. This is considerable based on the size of our economies in the region. This figure does not include what individual countries earn when we host a tour.

We want CHANGE – let’s be the change and play our respective roles.